Two Example Movie Pitches from former Expo 1213 (American Gangster) Students

Example Movie Pitch  #1 [audio-visual / Fall 2016]

My Way: The Frank Sinatra Story

Example Movie Pitch #2 [Textual–read aloud/performed using “movie trailer voice” / Spring 2018]

Romance: The Great Divider

Picture this: It’s 1934, there are two star crossed lovers sitting in a convertible that’s wildly swerving, back and forth, they’re cackling wildly, everything about this picture makes you think wow, wild. Flash forward to their dead bodies lying in the dirt, surrounded by law enforcement clapping and celebrating and drinking to these lovers’ deaths. Sad, right? Definitely.

Now picture this: two criminals, spitting out the windows of an old, beat up car. The car swerves into a gas station, the gangsters get out and rob the place bare, and run out laughing like hyenas. Flash forward to their dead bodies lying in the dirt, surrounded by law enforcement clapping and celebrating and drinking to their deaths. Sad, right? Not exactly.

These two narratives are the same, but told differently. One has the story of star crossed lovers,one leaves out the romance. Your perception of these people is completely different based on how I told you the narrative.

Romance changes the narrative, and I want to explore how the public receives the gangsters with romance and without romance, with the specific example of Bonnie and Clyde and the Barrow Gang.

Romance: the Great Divider
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Movie Pitch Inspiration!

In case you need inspiration to write the movie pitch for your research essay topic….

I give you the trailer for: Twins !

Your  pitch doesn’t have to include video, just audio—just your voice. You have the option to record yourself reading your pitch, filming yourself reading your pitch, or reading your pitch aloud in class when it’s your turn.

If you decide to record a video or audio pitch, you can upload it to Canvas as an audio file or link to your blog and host the pitch there—it’s entirely up to you!

Electoral College + Winner Take All Politics + the Risk of anti-Majority Outcomes

The Electoral College Debate–from a Different Perspective

“The debate over the Electoral College this week is familiar, but off point.

Set off by criticism from Senator Elizabeth Warren, the discussion has often focused on the system’s real but minor bias toward small states, and the system’s intended (by the founders) but now entirely ineffectual role in preventing the “tyranny” of direct democracy.

It largely misses the real reason the Electoral College so often produces results counter to the majority: The winner takes all within most states. You get all of Michigan’s electoral votes whether you win by one vote or a million votes.

There are legitimate arguments to keep the present winner-take-all system, even arguments that today’s progressive opponents of the Electoral College could appreciate. In the 1880s, for instance, it limited the electoral gains that white supremacist Democrats reaped by disenfranchising black voters.

But the Electoral College also brings the risk of anti-majority outcomes — in which the winner of the national popular vote loses the election — for no high-minded reasons at all, as occurred in 2000 and 2016. It even has the potential to worsen the kind of crises it was intended to prevent.”

 

Should the District of Columbia become our fifty-first state?

Democrats Push to Make Washington, D.C., the Fifty-first State

“In the coming days, the House will vote on, and likely pass, H.R. 51, a bill that would make Washington, D.C., the fifty-first state. The bill, which has two hundred co-sponsors, was introduced by Eleanor Holmes Norton, a Democrat who for nearly thirty years has served as the non-voting representative for D.C.’s single at-large district. During her time in Congress, Holmes Norton has introduced more than a dozen statehood bills; this will be the first since 1993 to receive a vote. But because Washington, D.C., is not a state, Holmes Norton cannot vote on her own bill, or on final passage of other legislation on the House floor.”

What Did Frederick Douglass Read…?

“A Frederick Douglass Reading List: Reading Recommendations From A Lifelong Education”

Frederick Douglass, George L. Ruffin wrote in his introduction to the orator and abolitionist’s third biography, “seems to have realized the fact that to one who is anxious to become educated and is really in earnest, it is not positively necessary to go to college, and that information may be had outside of college walks; books may be obtained and read elsewhere.” Douglass, he added, “never made the mistake (a common one) of considering that his education was finished. He has continued to study, he studies now, and is a growing man, and at this present moment he is a stronger man intellectually than ever before.”

Midterm Election Fraud? Really? In 2018?

Just one example of the many instances of voter fraud plotted during the 2018 midterm elections…

North Carolina Election Fraud Hearings

“In early December, the bipartisan agency had refused to certify the election results because of irregularities discovered with hundreds of mail-in ballots, most of which had originated in Bladen County. In the course of last week’s hearings, in Raleigh, investigators laid out their case—based on at least a hundred and seventy-two interviews and tens of thousands of pages of records—that the election had been tainted by a “coordinated, unlawful, and substantially resourced absentee ballot scheme.” At the center of the scandal was the Republican operative Harris had employed in Bladen County, Leslie McCrae Dowless, whose operation, according to investigators, included filling out at least a thousand mail-in-ballot requests, many without voters’ knowledge, and deploying a team of friends, family members, and other associates to pose as election officials and collect them. Votes for Democrats were allegedly tossed out, and everything else was cast—or altered—for Harris.Among the important questions to be answered at the hearings was what Harris knew about Dowless’s scheme, and when he knew about it.”

Programs that increase voter turnout: in this case, younger American voters

Voter Reforms Key in Young Voter Turnout

“Automatic Voter Registration (AVR) and preregistration are innovative policies that can increase voter registration and broaden civic engagement among Millennials and Generation Zs. Using the AVR and preregistration programs in Oregon and California as examples, along with new data from the 2018 midterm elections, this report illustrates the success these policies have had in registering eligible young people to vote and increasing their civic participation” Continue reading “Programs that increase voter turnout: in this case, younger American voters”